The future is here! LaMar's Donuts is taking its delicious treats to the skies with drones. While the shop's drone deliveries are not in everyday use yet, it's definitely a step in the right direction.


Applications and Uses
Journalism, Filming and aerial photography — Drones are starting to be used in sports photography and cinematography. They were used in the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi for filming skiing and snowboarding events. Another group considering using drones is journalists. The ability to collect footage and information for use in live broadcast is a real possibility in the near future. aerial photography for the Real estate market is becoming more popular also.
 

Shipping/ Delivery — While the FFA is not in favor of Drone delivery, company’s like Amazon, UPS and DHL see its potential. Drones can be used to deliver small packages, pizzas, letters, medicines, beverages etc. at short distances
 

Disaster Management — After a natural or man made disaster, a drone provides a quick means to gather information, navigate debris with a portable and useful technology that doesn’t drown out cries for help, and that can be deployed by teams that are working a specific area. Equipped with high definition cameras and radars, Drones can give rescuers access to a higher field of view without the need for wasting resources on manned helicopters. And, because of their small size, they can provide a close-up view of areas where larger aerial vehicles would prove perilous or inefficient.
 

Search and Rescue/ Healthcare — With thermal sensors, drones can quickly discover the location of lost persons, and are particularly useful at night or in challenging terrain. The search and rescue mission is a battle against time, particularly in harsh conditions, and drones become a powerful tool because of the ease of deployment. Besides locating victims, a Drone could potentially be used to “drop in supplies” to an otherwise unreachable location. For example a drone might be utilized to lower a walkie talkie, gps locater, med supplies or water to a stranded victim before rescue crews are able to extract them.
 

Geographic Mapping — Drones can reach difficult-to-access locations like eroded coastline or mountaintops and acquire very high-resolution data to create 3D maps. The technology is already available to amateurs and professionals, enabling them to collect data and instantly download the imagery. Some are even using the collected data to contribute to crowd-sourced mapping applications like OpenStreetMap.
 

Structural Safety Inspections — Drones can provide faster access to high-quality, real-time visual inspection for all types of utility company’s that need to inspect power lines, oil and gas pipelines, transmission towers, buildings and bridges, wind turbines and rotor blades enabling the inspector or team to access the information from a safe position. The inspection of complex infrastructure will benefit from regular aerial monitoring. The ability to sense in three dimensions, take thermal readings, and to detect metal strain will greatly improve infrastructure inspection. Small Drones that can hover and get close will provide a new level of detail to improve performance.
 

Precision Agriculture — Agricultural use of drones could comprise 80% of the market. The reasons include the need to closely monitor crops to improve management and yield, the need to do this more regularly and cheaply, and the environment of private land with little threat to others. Near-infrared sensors can be tuned to detect crop health, letting farmers react and improve conditions locally with inputs of fertilizer or insecticide.
 

Wildlife Monitoring/Pooching  — Poaching is a bigger problem than ever before, elephants, rhinos, and big cats are vanishing at a disturbing clip, The presence of drones has proven to serve as a deterrent to poachers and illegal loggers. They also monitor salmon, rabbits, seals, sea lions providing new insight into animal behavior. The devices have many advantages in this type of monitoring and research, including the ability to approach wildlife closely without spooking it, the ability to operate at night, and with thermal camera sensors, drones provide unprecedented protection.
 

Law-Enforcement and border patrol — Helps with crowd surveillance and public safety, help in monitoring criminal activity, Crime scene and fire investigations. The border patrol monitors criminal smugglers of migrants and drugs with Drones.
 

Construction Sites — The monitoring from above of construction project sites provides a new input during all phases of a project life cycle. Aerial photography is done now for only the largest projects, however the input would be used more widely and more frequently if more readily accessible. The ability to quickly model from above in 3D with increasing precision will provide a important way to check on projects, compare to plans, as well as better coordination of materials on the job site.
 

Storm Tracking/Forecasting — Sending drones into hurricanes and tornadoes provides new insight into their behavior and trajectory. Unmanned systems are the best approach to these dangerous situations, and with specialized sensors to detail weather parameters, new insight becomes possible.
 








Drones

  1. ground station drone omega ground station drone omega
  2. horus dynamics zero horus dynamics zero
  3. horus dynamics zero t horus dynamics zero t
  4. drone humanitarian aid drone humanitarian aid
  5. drone insurance inspection drone insurance inspection
  6. drone video sports drone video sports
  7. drone search and rescue drone search and rescue
  8. drones drones
  9. thank you thank you
  10. thermal imaging bergamo thermal imaging bergamo
  11. thermography drone professional thermography drone professional
  12. thermography thermography
  13. drone sensors drone sensors
  14. aerial shooting drone milan aerial shooting drone milan
  15. contacts drones contacts drones
  16. drone servicesagriculture drone agriculture
  17. technologies for drone technologies for drone
  18. drones yacht promotion drones yacht promotion
  19. horus dynamics horus dynamics
  20. video drone bergamo video drone bergamo
  21. drone video real estate drone video real estate

 

Droni

Stampa 3d

 

Ecologists are increasingly using drones to gather data. Scientists have used remotely piloted aircraft to estimate the health of fragile polar mosses, to measure and predict the mass of leopard seals, and even to collect whale snot. Drones have also been labelled as game-changers for wildlife population monitoring.

But once the take-off dust settles, how do we know if drones produce accurate data? Perhaps even more importantly, how do the data compare to those gathered using a traditional ground-based approach?

To answer these questions we created the #EpicDuckChallenge, which involved deploying thousands of plastic replica ducks on an Adelaide beach, and then testing various methods of tallying them up.

As we report today in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution, drones do indeed generate accurate wildlife population data – even more accurate, in fact, than those collected the old-fashioned way.


Jarrod Hodgson standing in one of the replica colonies of seabirds constructed for the #EpicDuckChallenge. S. Andriolo
Assessing the accuracy of wildlife count data is hard. We can’t be sure of the true number of animals present in a group of wild animals. So, to overcome this uncertainty, we created life-sized, replica seabird colonies, each with a known number of individuals.

From the optimum vantage and in ideal weather conditions, experienced wildlife spotters independently counted the colonies from the ground using binoculars and telescopes. At the same time, a drone captured photographs of each colony from a range of heights. Citizen scientists then used these images to tally the number of animals they could see.

Counts of birds in drone-derived imagery were better than those made by wildlife observers on the ground. The drone approach was more precise and more accurate – it produced counts that were consistently closer to the true number of individuals.


Comparing the vantages: drone-derived photographs and the ground counter’s view. J. Hodgson
The difference between the results was not trivial. Drone-derived data were between 43% and 96% more accurate than ground counts. The variation was due to how many pixels represented each bird, which in turn is related to the height that the drone was flown and the resolution of the camera.

This wasn’t a surprise. The experienced ground counters did well, but the drone’s vantage point was superior. Observing photos taken from above meant the citizen scientists did not have to contend with obscured birds that often occur during ground counts. The imagery also benefited the citizen scientists as they could digitally review their counts as many times as they needed. This reduced the likelihood of both missing an individual and counting an individual more than once.


The scientists were assisted by many volunteers, without whom the #EpicDuckChallenge would not have been possible. J. Hodgson
However, even though it proved to be more accurate, making manual digital counts is still tedious and time-consuming. To address this, we developed a computer algorithm in the hope that it could further improve efficiency without diminishing data quality. And it did.

We delineated a proportion of birds in each colony to train the algorithm to recognise how the animal of interest appeared in the imagery. We found that using 10% training data was sufficient to produce a colony count that was comparable to that of a human reviewing the entire scene.

This computerisation can reduce the time needed to process data, providing the opportunity to cut the costs and resources needed to survey wildlife populations. When combined with the efficiencies drones provide for surveying sites that are hard to access on foot, these savings may be considerable.

Using drone monitoring in the field
Our results have important implications for a range of species. We think they are especially relevant to aggregating birds, including seabirds like albatrosses, surface nesting penguins and frigatebirds, as well as colonial nesting waterbirds like pelicans.

Other types of animals that are easily seen from above, including hauled-out seals and dugongs, are highly suited to drone monitoring. The nests or tracks of animals, such as orangutans and turtles, can also be used to infer presence.

Additional experiments will be useful to assess the ability of drones to survey animals that prefer to stay hidden and those within complex habitats. Such assessments are of interest to us, and researchers around the globe, with current investigations focused on wildlife such as arboreal mammals and cetaceans.

We are still learning about how wildlife react to the presence of drones, and more research is required to quantify these responses in a range of species and environments. The results will help to refine and improve drone monitoring protocols so that drones have minimal impact on wildlife. This is particularly important for species that are prone to disturbance, and where close proximity is not possible or desirable.




Drones

  1. ground station drone omega ground station drone omega
  2. horus dynamics zero horus dynamics zero
  3. horus dynamics zero t horus dynamics zero t
  4. drone humanitarian aid drone humanitarian aid
  5. drone insurance inspection drone insurance inspection
  6. drone video sports drone video sports
  7. drone search and rescue drone search and rescue
  8. drones drones
  9. thank you thank you
  10. thermal imaging bergamo thermal imaging bergamo
  11. thermography drone professional thermography drone professional
  12. thermography thermography
  13. drone sensors drone sensors
  14. aerial shooting drone milan aerial shooting drone milan
  15. contacts drones contacts drones
  16. drone servicesagriculture drone agriculture
  17. technologies for drone technologies for drone
  18. drones yacht promotion drones yacht promotion
  19. horus dynamics horus dynamics
  20. video drone bergamo video drone bergamo
  21. drone video real estate drone video real estate

 

Droni

Stampa 3d

 

They have searched for victims inside collapsed buildings, collected disaster data, detected dangerous materials and conditions and deployed first aid kits.

But the unmanned robotic systems we have today operation under severe constraints: They need a human to remotely steer the device or a strong GPS signal and open spaces to allow auto-piloted manoeuvring.

 

The real challenge for robotics researchers is to develop unmanned rescue robots that are capable of making independent decisions and have the ability to work unsupervised in confined, chaotic spaces.

In the future, rescue drones will be the first on scene, scouring beneath collapsed buildings or looking for plane wreckage in the thick forest, seeking survivors that might otherwise take days to reach.

Drones

  1. ground station drone omega ground station drone omega
  2. horus dynamics zero horus dynamics zero
  3. horus dynamics zero t horus dynamics zero t
  4. drone humanitarian aid drone humanitarian aid
  5. drone insurance inspection drone insurance inspection
  6. drone video sports drone video sports
  7. drone search and rescue drone search and rescue
  8. drones drones
  9. thank you thank you
  10. thermal imaging bergamo thermal imaging bergamo
  11. thermography drone professional thermography drone professional
  12. thermography thermography
  13. drone sensors drone sensors
  14. aerial shooting drone milan aerial shooting drone milan
  15. contacts drones contacts drones
  16. drone servicesagriculture drone agriculture
  17. technologies for drone technologies for drone
  18. drones yacht promotion drones yacht promotion
  19. horus dynamics horus dynamics
  20. video drone bergamo video drone bergamo
  21. drone video real estate drone video real estate

 

Droni

Stampa 3d

 

↑このページのトップヘ